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Paul Oyer: internet dating an economics course,Companies’ Talk is Cheap, Too

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The Returns to Elite Degrees: The Case of American Lawyers. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer ILR Review. Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer Handbook of Labor Economics, Volume 4B.

The Making of an Investment Banker: Stock Market Shocks, Career Choice, and Lifetime Income. Paul Oyer Journal of Finance. Costs of Broad-Based Stock Option Plans. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer Journal of Financial Intermediation. Initial Labor Market Conditions and Long-Term Outcomes for Economists.

Paul Oyer Journal of Economic Perspectives. Mandated Disclosure, Stock Returns, and the Securities Acts Amendments. Michael Greenstone, Paul Oyer, Annette Vissing-Jorgensen Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Why Do Some Firms Give Stock Options To All Employees? Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer Journal of Financial Economics. Why Do Firms Use Incentives That Have No Incentive Effects?

Litigation Costs and Returns to Experience. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer American Economic Review. A Theory of Sales Quotas with Limited Liability and Rent Sharing. Paul Oyer Journal of Labor Economics. The timeliness of performance information in determining executive compensation. Kevin F. Hallock , Paul Oyer Journal of Corporate Finance. Fiscal Year Ends and Non-Linear Incentive Contracts: The Effect on Business Seasonality.

Paul Oyer Quarterly Journal of Economics. Paul Oyer Yale University Press. Roadside MBA: Back Road Lessons for Entrepreneurs, Executives and Small Business Owners. Michael Mazzeo, Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer Business Plus. Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned from Online Dating. Paul Oyer Harvard Business Review Press. Book Chapters Personnel Economics. Edward Lazear, Paul Oyer The Handbook of Organizational Economics.

Working Papers The Gender Earnings Gap in the Gig Economy: Evidence from over a Million Rideshare Drivers. List, Paul Oyer June 7, Dinner Table Human Capital and Entrepreneurship.

Hans K. Hvide, Paul Oyer December 14, Exploration for Human Capital: Evidence from the MBA Labor Market. Paul Oyer, Camelia Kuhnen March Welcome to the Club: The Returns to an Elite Degree for American Lawyers. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer December Firm-Employee Matching: An Industry Study of American Lawyers. Paul Oyer, Scott Schaefer October Managerial Incentives and Value Creation: Evidence from Private Equity. Philip Leslie, Paul Oyer September Personnel Economics.

Edward Lazear, Paul Oyer October Teaching Degree Courses GSBGEN The Core Curriculum in the Workplace. GSBGEN The Last Lecture Series. MGTECON Managerial Economics.

MGTECON Business and Public Policy Perspectives on U. Accelerate your understanding of artificial intelligence and gain real-world insights to help transform your business. Big Data, Strategic Decisions: Analysis to Action. Data-Driven Decision Making. Discover the business side of data and learn how to ask the right questions to inform decision making and improve business outcomes.

Harnessing AI for Breakthrough Innovation and Strategic Impact. Experience an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to artificial intelligence and learn how your organization can apply it for strategic advantage. Audio: The Economics of Online Dating. Stanford GSB Affiliations Faculty Affiliate Golub Capital Social Impact Lab. Service to the Profession Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Labor Economics, November November Editor, Journal of Labor Economics, The Wall Street Journal April 30, Finding Success in the Digital Marketplace.

Stanford GSB June 18, Two New Books Offer an Alternative MBA. Inc May 01, Paul Oyer: Everything I Ever Needed To Know About Economics, I Learned From Online Dating. CBC The Current February 14, Back on the Market: What Online Dating Reveals About Economics. KQED Forum February 13, Dating Sites Offer Chance At Love — And A Lesson In Economics.

NPR All Things Considered February 12, Paul Oyer: online dating an economics class. SF Chronicle December 21, Insights by Stanford Business The Price of Cheap Talk: What Economics Teaches Us About Communication.

July 19, In this episode, we explore how economic concepts show up in everyday communication. Utility Player: Paul Oyer Explains How Economics Can Make Sports More Fun. July 12, The thrill of victory. The agony of defeat. The joy of calculating the optimal strategy for soccer penalty kicks. July 11, Summer Reading: 11 Books to Keep Your Mind Busy.

July 07, The latest books from Stanford GSB faculty and lecturers. Adapting to Pandemic, Latino-Owned Businesses Get Stronger. January 28, Research finds Latino entrepreneurs leaning into tech, bolstering employee benefits. How COVID Has Reshaped Work. October 19, Offices, commutes, and gigs have been disrupted — for now. Latino Entrepreneurs Face — and Can Overcome — Funding Obstacles. January 29, A new report details the barriers to loan approval for Latino-owned businesses — and points to ways to break them down.

The Research Revolution. November 20, Access to superabundant data has transformed the methods of scholastic inquiry — and possibly the basic tenets of inquiry itself. How Latino Entrepreneurs Can Boost the U. January 31, Latinos are launching businesses at an unprecedented pace, but barriers — some long-standing, some brand new — keep them from reaching their potential.

December 06, Communication mistakes, job-stealing robots, and career-gap explanations captured reader attention this year. What to Read This Summer. July 02, Escape the heat with books recommended by Stanford business professors. Rising U. June 27, An economist and a business advisor discuss what might happen if the gap between rich and poor continues to grow.

Artificial Intelligence for the Perplexed Executive. We reserve the right to close comments at any time. Join the conversation Create account. Already have an account? Paul Oyer: Everything I Ever Needed To Know About Economics, I Learned From Online Dating CBC Radio Loaded. The Current Paul Oyer: Everything I Ever Needed To Know About Economics, I Learned From Online Dating Economist Paul Oyer believes people seeking a partner on-line should study economics since the internet has turned romance into just one more marketplace.

Social Sharing. CBC Radio · Posted: Feb 14, AM ET Last Updated: February 14, The Current Paul Oyer: Everything I Ever Needed To Know About Economics, I Learned From Online Dating. The online hunt for a honey is even more of a marketplace than we thought. A Stanford economist, who went online to date, discovered all the searching and signaling that goes with it is actually right out of his textbooks.

The dismal science turns out to be the blueprint for love. Who knew? Check out the dating profile we constructed for The Current. So, you've been forced into online dating. Let's assume that you want to do it effectively. First things first, your profile. Photos: they're required. Minimum of three.

Maximum of ten. And if you're making the same face in every single photo, they don't count as one. Weird face, social situations, you looking pensive on a rock all excellent. Also, no bathroom selfies! Online advice from Malia AuParis A busy market floor is probably the last place you might associate with romance More from this episode Would you date The Current?

Is it still acceptable for politicians to fail on social media?

When I set up my dating profile, I was upfront about my teenage children and my sweet but impish golden retriever. com where they ask some very personal questions, I checked a few boxes that were not technically accurate.

I admit it. I left out details — and lied. What led me to be honest on some parts of my profile and not others? We can find the answer in a branch of game theory known as cheap talk. A cheap talk framework considers the potential conflict between my preferences and those of the women I am trying to attract and lets us analyze, in a given situation, when and if it is sensible to hide information or lie outright.

Since what was true and what I thought would appeal to people were often the same, I could quickly fill in most answers. But sometimes there was a conflict between an honest answer and what I thought would make me attrac­tive. Game theory would say it all came down to utility: the degree to which I was forthcoming depended on what I thought the people were looking for, as well as the probable cost to me of lying about myself. As much as we would all love to be loved for the people we are, things are more complicated.

A woman and I can find each other attractive, but at the same time, she finds my favorite Internet video extremely unfunny, or feels she could never go out with anyone who checked a certain box regarding politics. If I revealed my video and views, that woman would never agree to meet me in the first place. So I, like many others, hide these minutiae. Research shows that minor lying is prevalent on dating sites, with a typical person claiming to be an inch taller, about 5 pounds lighter, and a year or two younger.

Unfortunately, profile inflators have a major impact on those of us who would like to tell the truth. Their lies lead all of us to discount claims as cheap talk. But I prominently displayed two features on my profile — my teenage children and the big, friendly dog that is not so familiar with the concepts of personal space and hygiene — that would be big turnoffs to many people.

When it comes to children and dogs, my interests need to be perfectly aligned with those of potential partners. This is key to cheap talk models: The cooperative side suggests that the more genuinely aligned the interests of the provider and consumer of information, the more accurate the information will be. Lying — the noncooperative part of game theory — occurs far more often with baseline data we all share, like looks, income and age, where everyone wants to seem as attractive as possible.

But not everybody has teenagers or a hairy canine sidekick, which are non-negotiable. The logic that drives our online profiles also leads companies and their top managers to stretch the truth. One example was documented by Dartmouth economists Jonathan Zinman and Eric Zitzewitz, who found that ski resorts exaggerate their snowfall, especially during periods generally weekends when they have more to gain by doing so.

But just as Internet daters will exaggerate less if they think they will get caught, ski resorts tell the truth more when skiers can catch their lies. The proliferation of smartphones has made it possible to question snow reports in real time. One SkiReport. More like 0. Corporate cheap talk is so common it extends all the way to top executives.

But sophisticated shareholders are a lot like skeptical Internet daters. The CEO, knowing the market will discount what she says, really has no choice but to inflate expectations. Similarly, stock analysts have also been widely identified as potential providers of cheap talk.

By convention and SEC rules, the people who do these analyses are supposed to be isolated from people at the bank who handle the stock offering. Hsiou-wei Lin and Maureen McNichols studied in detail the recommendations of investment bank analysts at the time of new stock offerings. Lin and McNichols showed that independent analysts were considerably less generous with their forecasts than analysts whose bank had a relationship with a company.

As we would expect, however, the market assumes this exaggeration. As a result, the stock market is less responsive to the recommendations made by an analyst whose bank has an underwriting relationship with the company he analyzes relative to those made by a truly independent analyst. In addition to hanging on the words of analysts and CEOs, the stock market waits breathlessly for statements by one person in particular — the chairman of the Federal Reserve.

Statements by the Fed chairman have the potential to be cheap talk. The Fed can always say he or she plans to take certain actions regarding interest rates just to try to calm the markets, or that things look better than they do. But the Fed is often somewhat cagey about its intentions, providing ranges — rather than exact numbers — for certain financial targets. He found that if the Fed announced a precise target, such as that the inflation rate should be 2 percent, there might be situations in which it made this announcement when its true goal was 4 percent inflation.

There is less scope for manipulation when announcing a target range, such as 1 percent to 3 percent inflation. So cheap talk is more believable when a range is provided than when someone pins himself down with an exact figure.

Perhaps, then, I should update my online profile to say that I am between 45 and 55 years old and between 5 feet 8 inches and 6 feet 2 inches tall. So, how can you overcome cheap talk?

An online dating site in Korea tried to find out. The site, essentially the Korean equivalent of Match. com, ran a special event: Over a five-day proposal period, participants browsed online profiles as in standard online dating, but could show only up to 10 people that they were interested in a date.

In addition, some participants could offer a virtual rose along with two of their date requests. Next, there was a four-day period during which people responded essentially yes or no to the proposals they received. The company then matched up the mutually interested pairs. Why did the site add the element of the virtual rose, and did it affect the outcomes of the dating arrangements? The answers are that a couple of economists talked them into it, and, yes, it had large effects.

The idea of signaling something to someone you are trying to impress was modeled by Michael Spence in the early s and won a Nobel Prize in , and these economists wanted to try it out. But note that what makes the signal work in this case is that it costs something. Participants who use the virtual rose have to give up something very important — the ability to show special interest in others. Signals become meaningful only if they are costly. When Michael Spence originally explained signaling, online dating had not yet been invented and he had to think of another venue for his idea.

He imagined a world where colleges exist only so that prospective employers can figure out whom they want to hire. In the model, there are exactly two types of people — those who are talented and those who are innately unskilled.

But suppose that only the talented people will be able to graduate from college. They may learn nothing useful, but they show employers that they are talented and, as a result, they are eligible for higher-level jobs.

In this model, education has solved our cheap talk problem. A potential employee puts his money where his mouth is by spending a lot of time and money on his education to prove rather than just say that he is talented. As the Korean dating site results showed, the signaling idea applies quite nicely to the virtual rose.

If a man or woman sent a standard proposal, the recipient accepted about 15 percent of the time. But about 18 percent of proposals that came with a virtual rose were accepted, which means sending a rose increased the chances of acceptance by about one-fifth.

Looking at who accepted which proposals provides more evidence for the credibility of virtual rose proposals. Tracking height, earnings, education and other characteristics, the company that runs the dating site can determine which participants will be viewed as more or less desirable.

The virtual roses do not matter that much for the most desirable people. But the effect of a virtual rose is largest on the middle desirability group. They are almost twice as likely to accept a proposal with a rose than one without. To them, being told in a credible manner that they really are particularly attractive is very meaningful.

They have heard a lot of cheap talk in their lives, and they value someone backing it up. Or, put another way, the rose is a meaningful investment in the person because the sender had to give up other opportunities in order to send it. These are effective ways to signal that you really mean what you say. Adapted from Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating Harvard Business Review Press.

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4 of 5 Paul Oyer, a professor at Stanford University, poses for a portrait at Stanford college in Palo Alto, Calif. on Thursday,. When year-old Paul Oyer begun online dating after 20  · 4 of 5 Paul Oyer, a teacher at Stanford institution, poses for a portrait at Stanford college in Palo Alto, Calif. on Thursday,. Whenever year-old Paul Oyer going online  · 4 of 5 Paul Oyer, a professor at Stanford college, poses for a portrait at Stanford college in Palo Alto, Calif. on Thursday,. Whenever year-old Paul Oyer begun online  · 4 of 5 Paul Oyer, a professor at Stanford University, poses for a portrait at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. on Thursday,. Whenever year-old Paul Oyer started internet This is the Chinese version of the reading material. 上午 paul oyer: what online dating can teach about economics stanford graduate school of business latest ... read more

Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. Participants will gain a better understanding of AI and how to leverage the technologies for their organizations. Techniques point — being attractive assists. Check out the dating profile we constructed for The Current. They may learn nothing useful, but they show employers that they are talented and, as a result, they are eligible for higher-level jobs. Enlarge this image.

The Fed can always say he or she plans to take certain actions regarding interest rates just to try to calm the markets, or that things look better than they do, paul oyer online dating. The Making of an Investment Banker: Paul oyer online dating Market Shocks, Career Choice, and Lifetime Income. Looking at who accepted which proposals provides more evidence for the credibility of virtual rose proposals. His comprehension of IPOs could instruct your about where you can capture his go out for lunch address: somewhere high priced. by Paul Oyer. What do you think of Paul Oyer's discovery February 07,

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